Meghann Coffey – Physiotherapist

Meghann Coffey Physiotherapist

Meghann graduated from Univeristy of Newcastle in 2016 with Bachelor of Physiotherapy (Honours).

During Meghann’s last year of university, she received sponsorship from the Australian Defence Force (ADF) to complete her degree and step into the Australian Army on completion of her degree as a Lieutenant Physiotherapist. Meghann’s role involves treating military members with sports and musculoskeletal injuries on Barracks and out in the field. She has also been lucky enough to travel to New Zealand with the ADF Hockey team and Tonga with the Australian Army Rugby Union team.


In Meghann’s spare time she is passionate about running, particularly ultra trail marathons. She has completed four 100km races and plans to race 100miles in 2020.

Posted in Our Team, Physiotherapists |

Podiatrist – Helen Woodward

Podiatrist – Helen Woodward

  Helen graduated from QUT in 2018 with a Bachelors of  Podiatry. She chose to become a Podiatrist after being heavily involved in sports during school and university, having experienced several injuries that Physiotherapists and Podiatrists helped her manage and overcome.

When she’s not working Helen enjoys playing touch football and is training for her first marathon!

Helen is motivated to assist her patients in staying active and reaching their goals in any way possible. You can find Helen in the clinic on a Saturday morning and a Tuesday evening.

Posted in Our Team, Podiatrists |

Quick Tips for the Workplace

How many times have you been sitting at your desk, busily getting jobs done, when you look at the clock and realise you haven’t moved in hours?

Or how often are you stuck in one position while you work on a car engine, or fix the plumbing in a bathroom?

This is all too common in the workplace, especially as our jobs become more demanding and we find ourselves sacrificing break times to do more work. Sustained postures, especially postures that are not ideal for your body (see article on ergonomics), increases your risk for an overuse injury. In the workplace, the back and neck are most commonly injured in this manner.

Here are some simple strategies that can be used to avoid these common workplace injuries:

  1. Check the set up of your chair, desk, worksite or workbench, and tools (see article on ergonomics).
  2. Look into getting a sit-to-stand desk. These desks have an adjustable height, where you can alternate between sitting and standing. This allows your legs and back to change position, and prevents other issues like knee stiffness or tight leg muscles.
  3. If you cannot access a sit-to-stand desk, another great option is to stand up every 30-60mins. An easy way to incorporate this into your day is to stand up every time you have a drink, or march on the spot while on the telephone. You could also set up a reminder on your computer, and do 10 seconds of neck stretches or shoulder rolls when it comes up on the screen.
  4. If you are working away from a desk or outdoors, an alarm on your phone or smart watch can cue you to stand tall, do neck stretches, shoulder rolls, or leg stretches for 10 seconds.
  5. Taking a short walk during lunch times is a great way to get the whole body moving, loosen the back and break up screen time or stationary postures.
  6. Whether you are working in an office, on a site outdoors, or in a workshop, it is important to regularly change what you are doing. Sustained postures and repeated movements are the major cause of work injuries, thus changing duties, equipment and positions will greatly reduce your risk of hurting yourself.

If you have any questions about your workplace set up, or want further information, give us a call on (07) 3511 6352

Posted in Backs Necks & Headaches, Client Education, Sports, Lifestyle & Miscellaneous |

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Where is the Carpal Tunnel?

Your carpal tunnel sits of the palm side of your wrist, and is a narrow tunnel that is formed between the bones and ligaments of the wrist/hand. Various tendons, blood vessels and a nerve pass through this space. When this nerve, called the Median Nerve, is compressed or irritated, it is called Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS). In the past it was one of the conditions that got a name RSI or Repetitive Strain Injury.

Symptoms of CTS include;

  • Pins and needles, numbness or pain in the thumb, index finger, middle finger, and part of the ring finger
  • Swelling of the hand or wrist
  • Difficulty determining hot vs cold
  • Weakness of the hand/wrist
  • Symptoms are often worse at night, especially when sleeping on the affected hand

 

There are many factors that contribute to CTS, all of which result in an increased pressure inside the tunnel that compresses the Median Nerve.

These causes may include;

  • Fracture of the forearm or hand
  • Inflammation of the tendons
  • Pregnancy
  • Diabetes
  • Rheumatoid Arthritis
  • Work that involves a lot of wrist movements up & down, typing, cooking, vibrations etc.

 

What can physiotherapy do?

Your physiotherapist will do an assessment of your wrist and your day-to-day tasks that involve the wrist to determine what is causing the CTS. From there, your physio will be able to suggest strategies to reduce inflammation and pain, and change the way you are working to allow the structures to rest. Strengthening exercises will be important to ensure your wrist doesn’t lose strength, so follow the physio’s guidelines and exercise prescription. Additionally, splinting may be required to ensure the wrist doesn’t fall into bad positions.

If you require surgery, physiotherapy will be an important part of your recovery including pain management, scar desensitisation and strengthening exercises.

What else can be done?

If your symptoms are not resolving, you may be referred to your GP for nerve conduction tests or scans. If conservative management is not effective, surgery may be required.

Posted in Client Education, Upper Limb |

Tae Kwon Do Injury

TKD Injury Newsletter Series

Martial arts is becoming an increasingly popular sport among people of all ages and abilities. An information spread will be developed in the coming months about the injuries associated with Tae Kwon Do (TKD) and how to best prepare yourself for participating in the art. While the articles will be focussing on TKD, the concepts involved and its impact on the body can be transferred to other martial arts, as can the physiotherapy treatment.

TKD is a Korean martial art that uses various parts of the body in physical combat for self-defence. Students use their arms and legs to strike an opponent in a variety of quick, powerful kicks and punches. There are 3 main components of TKD;

  • Poomsae: sets of specific techniques that a student performs to demonstrate the various attacking and defensive moves.
  • Sparring: 1-on-1 semi-contact or full-contact rounds where students aim to score points by connecting their kicks or punches on their opponent.
  • Board breaking: students strike boards with various parts of their arms and legs with the aim to break the board to demonstrate power and precision.

To perform these components TKD students must have strength, power, agility, endurance, speed and flexibility. Many different forces and stresses are placed on the body of a martial artist, whether it is performing a spinning head kick, conditioning the arms and legs, or being hit with an opponent’s strike. Injuries are therefore common, but where do these injuries occur and what can be done to treat or prevent them?

Research has found that;

  • The knee is most commonly injured, followed by the ankle and shoulder
  • More injuries occur during training than competition, and kicking causes more injuries than punching
  • Contusion, sprains and strains are the most common types of injuries
  • Approximately half of injured TKD students sought medical help. Those who did not, experienced a relapse of their injury in the future
  • Most of the injuries lasted 0-4 weeks – a significant time away from training
  • Those who have been participating in TKD for ~3-5 years are more likely to sustain an injury than those who have been training for >7yrs
  • Due to the nature of TKD training, with multiple sessions a week for multiple hours, overuse injuries are also common
  • Not performing a cool down post-training increased risk of injury

Who is more at risk?

  • Those with less experience are more likely to be injured due to poor technique or not being conditioned to take a hit. Whereas those with more experience are likely to be injured due to high/spinning kicks
  • Those who practice high or spinning kicks are more likely to have lower limb injuries

If you are doing a martial art and have an injury, or if you are thinking about starting and are concerned about whether you are ‘ready’, book an appointment with us. We can help you get back to training and reduce your chance of injury.

Posted in Client Education, Sports, Lifestyle & Miscellaneous |

Can Physiotherapy Help Rib Fractures?

Can Physiotherapy Help Rib Fractures?

 

Rib fractures can be acute or chronic (stress fractures).

Some examples of what causes a rib fracture include;

  • Direct blow from a person e.g. rugby league, martial arts, AFL
  • Direct hit by an object e.g. cricket ball, motor vehicle accident, fall from height
  • Large muscle forces over time e.g. rowers, chronic coughing

 

Signs and symptoms of a rib fracture include;

  • Pain over the fracture site – can be at the front or side of the chest, or at the back
  • Pain may appear as chest pain, or radiate to the shoulder, neck or spine
  • Can experience an ache, particularly initially after injury
  • Pain with coughing, sneezing or laughing
  • Difficulty lying on the injured side
  • Pain with trunk movements (e.g. turning side to side) or arm movements

Rib fractures tend to heal in 6-8 weeks. During that time, physiotherapy can reduce your pain and maximise recovery.

This is achieved by;

  • Pain education and strategies to perform day-to-day tasks with minimal discomfort
  • Electrotherapy and soft tissue massage to relax muscles and reduce pain
  • Prescription of appropriate exercises to maintain strength of the surrounding muscles
  • Joint mobilisation to restore movement to stiff joints

Respiratory complications can occur after rib fractures, particularly with multiple fracture sites, underlying lung pathology, older age, or acquiring an illness after the fracture. Physiotherapy plays an important role in reducing this by prescribing breathing exercises and monitoring lung function. Physiotherapy also help provide a guideline for returning to sport or physical activity.

Give us a call on (07) 3511 6352 if you, or someone you know, has a rib fracture.

Posted in Client Education, Injury & Arthritis, Sports, Lifestyle & Miscellaneous |

Anthony Dantel – Physiotherapist

Anthony Dantell – Physiotherapist

Anthony graduated from the University of Queensland in 2015 with a Bachelor of Physiotherapy (Hons). Since graduating, Anthony has worked in the public health sector at the Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital with numerous different patient populations. He has spent time working with Musculoskeletal and orthopaedic injuries. He currently works as a Physiotherapist in the Emergency Department at the Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital.

Throughout university Anthony worked as a student physiotherapist with Brisbane State High School Rugby Union teams and volunteered to work as a student physiotherapist with the Queensland Reds Women’s and Youth Rugby teams. Currently Anthony enjoys treating a wide variety of conditions including low back and neck pain as well as lower limb injuries.

Outside of work, Anthony keeps fit by playing Australian Rules Football with the Redcliffe Tigers. He also enjoys snowboarding around the world, most recently returning from a trip to Japan.

Anthony has out of work hours on Mondays and Wednesdays as well as Saturday mornings.

Posted in Our Team, Physiotherapists |

What is a Total Shoulder Replacement (TSR)

What is a Total Shoulder Replacement (TSR)

TSR is a surgery performed for many reasons, including to reduce the symptoms of osteoarthritis in the shoulder, restore shoulder function after rotator cuff damage, or a fracture of the humerus (arm bone).The ultimate outcome of TSR is to reduce pain and improve quality of life. The surgery involves removing the damaged joint surfaces, and replacing them with implants to act as the joint surfaces.

 

What can Physiotherapy Do?

Physiotherapy can help at all of the 3 stages – preventing surgery, prehabilitation (before surgery) and rehabilitation (post-surgery)

  1. Prevention – prescribe appropriate exercises for you, based on your symptoms and presentation, to reduce pain, improve range, and strengthen the surrounding muscles to prolong or prevent the need for surgery.
  2. Prehabilitation – if you require surgery, physiotherapists can help ensure you are in the best shape to maximise your recovery and reduce your time in hospital. Your physiotherapist will teach you exercises to do in preparation, and begin practicing the exercises you will need after surgery. You may also practice using a sling, which you will need for a time post-surgery.
  3. Rehabilitation – your physiotherapist will assist your recovery greatly. They can use many different techniques to manage pain and swelling, increase your range, and strengthen the muscles around your shoulder.

 

Recovery

The long term outcome and healing times of a total shoulder replacement will depend on the reason for surgery i.e. it is different for a person with osteoarthritis compared to someone with rotator cuff disease. Generally, full recovery is between 1-2 years. The estimated range you may get back after surgery will be determined by your surgeon, and is based on multiple factors, therefore is different for each person. As a guideline, driving is often commenced at 8 weeks however this will be decided by your surgeon. There may also be some restriction on the positions allowed in the early phase after surgery, but this will also be guided by your surgeon.

Posted in Client Education, Upper Limb |

What is a Total Hip Replacement (THR)

What is a Total Hip Replacement (THR)

A THR is a commonly performed surgery that aims to reduce the symptoms of osteoarthritis in the hip, restore hip function, and improve your quality of life. The surgery involves removing the arthritic joint surfaces, and replacing them with implants to act as the joint surfaces.

What can Physiotherapy Do?

Physiotherapy can help at all of the 3 stages – preventing surgery, prehabilitation (before surgery) and rehabilitation (post-surgery)

  1. Prevention – prescribe appropriate exercises for you, based on your symptoms and presentation, to reduce pain and swelling, improve range, and strengthen the surrounding muscles to prolong or prevent the need for surgery. Studies have shown that appropriate body weight exercises will reduce your pain and improve function
  2. Prehabilitation – if you require surgery, physiotherapists can help ensure you are in the best shape to maximise your recovery and reduce your time in hospital. Your physiotherapist will teach you exercises to do in preparation, and begin practicing the exercises you will need after surgery. You will also practice using crutches or other aids that you will need initially post-surgery
  3. Rehabilitation – your physiotherapist will assist your recovery greatly. They can use many different techniques to manage pain, increase your range, and strengthen the leg muscles. The physiotherapist can also assist in helping you to decide when and how to walk without your walking aid.

 

Recovery

Total Hip Replacement surgery is highly successful, and you will be able to return to most activities after you have recovered. There are 2 approaches the surgeons can take to perform the THR – anterior or posterior. There are some precautions to follow depending on what approach your surgeon has used, to ensure you do not damage the implant.

Most surgeons recommend avoiding returning to high impact activities such as running and jumping. At full recovery, you will be able to enjoy pain free walking, stair climbing, bending/kneeling and low-impact exercising (cycling, swimming, walking, gym). Your surgeon will give you a guide as to when you can return to driving and work. Generally, you will be able to drive in 6 weeks.

Posted in Client Education, Hip & Knee |

Do I need a Total Knee Replacement?

What is a Total Knee Replacement (TKR)?

A TKR is a commonly performed surgery that aims to reduce the symptoms of osteoarthritis in the knee, restore knee function, and improve your quality of life. The surgery involves removing the arthritic joint surfaces, and replacing them with implants to act as the joint surfaces.

 

What can Physiotherapy Do?

Physiotherapy can help at all of the 3 stages – preventing surgery, prehabilitation (before surgery) and rehabilitation (post-surgery)

  1. Prevention – prescribe appropriate exercises for you, based on your symptoms and presentation, to reduce pain and swelling, improve range, and strengthen the surrounding muscles to prolong or prevent the need for surgery. Studies have shown that appropriate, body weight exercises will reduce your pain and improve function
  2. Prehabilitation – if you require surgery, physiotherapists can help ensure you are in the best shape to maximise your recovery and reduce your time in hospital. Your physiotherapist will teach you exercises to do in preparation, and begin practicing the exercises you will need after surgery. You will also practice using crutches or other aids that you will need initially post-surgery
  3. Rehabilitation – your physiotherapist will assist your recovery greatly. They can use many different techniques to manage pain and swelling, increase your range, and strengthen the leg muscles. The physiotherapist can also assist in when and how to walk without your walking aid.

 

Recovery

Total Knee Replacement surgery is highly successful, and you will be able to return to most activities after you have recovered. Most surgeons recommend avoiding returning to high impact activities such as running and jumping. You will notice swelling around your knee after surgery and this swelling can last up to 12 weeks. Your physiotherapist will assist with managing this. Your surgeon will give you a guide as to when you can return to driving and work. Generally, you will be able to drive in 6 weeks. Most people feel they have fully recovered in ~12 months.

 

Posted in Client Education, Hip & Knee |

What Is Arthritis?

What is arthritis?

Arthritis is considered to be an inflammatory condition that can affect any of the joints in your body. The most common form of arthritis is osteoarthritis.

Osteoarthritis is a “wear and tear” condition, where the articular cartilage in the joint wears away. Articular cartilage is a smooth material that covers joint surfaces. It allows the joint to move smoothly and protects the underlying bone. When this material wears away, the underlying bone is exposed and joint function is impaired.

There are many causes of osteoarthritis, including;

  • Age – older people are more likely to develop arthritis than younger people
  • Weight – a person who carries more weight produces more ground force, therefore your joints are under more stress and can lose articular cartilage more quickly
  • Genetics – your genes determine how much articular cartilage you can produce, and how strong it is. Some people have an increased risk to developing osteoarthritis with certain genetic differences
  • Previous knee injuries – an injury to any joint, even when young, may alter how you use that part of your body. By changing the way you move, forces are transmitted in unusual ways, which is where degeneration can occur
  • Physical Activity – participating in sport or work that is high impact (e.g. jumping, lifting heavy loads) increases your risk for osteoarthritis

Symptoms include;

  • Pain in the joint which may affect sleep
  • Swelling
  • Loss of movement
  • Loss of strength
  • Crackling or grating noise
  • Locking
  • Giving way (if in the lower limb)
  • Reduced ability to walk or perform other daily tasks

You may also notice deformity of the joint, as structural changes occur in response to the arthritic changes.

 

How is it diagnosed and managed?

Arthritis is often picked up through a subjective examination and physical examination of your joint by a doctor or other health practitioner. The diagnosis will then be confirmed by X-Ray.

It is recommended to seek treatment soon after symptoms begin rather than wait until your function is affected. Studies have shown that by losing weight (if weight is an issue), changing your diet and performing appropriate exercise can slow down the progression of osteoarthritis and even prevent the need for surgery. Conservative physio management has been shown in research to be very effective to avoid or delay the need for surgery in most people.

Once the pain escalates and is affecting sleep and day-to-day function, your GP may refer you to an orthopaedic surgeon to discuss the possible need for surgery. Common areas for replacement surgery are your knees, hips and shoulders. The surgery could be a partial joint replacement (where arthritis only affects part of the joint) or a full joint replacement.

Posted in Client Education, Injury & Arthritis |

Liza Devlin – Specialist Sports and Exercise Physiotherapist

Liza Devlin - Specialist Sports Physiotherapist

Liza Devlin – Specialist Sports and Exercise Physiotherapist

Liza’s interests lie in Sports, Exercise & Musculoskeletal medicine, particularly with  lower limb injury in the recreational athlete. After graduating from University of Queensland in 1993, Liza spent two years working in outpatient musculoskeletal physiotherapy & in the field of Sports Physiotherapy prior to completing a postgraduate diploma in Sports Physiotherapy, at Curtin University, in Perth. Liza then worked for two years in a Manipulative Physiotherapy private practice while completing her Masters of Sports Physiotherapy, focusing on hamstring pain. During this time, Liza was working with Club & State Representative Rugby Union teams & Australian Division II Schoolboys Rugby Union.

Upon return to Queensland, she has then had further experience as a private locum before establishing this practice in 1999. She has worked with Qld Schoolboys Rugby, Qld Suburban Representative Rugby Union, the Qld Rugby Union Referees Association, Club Rugby Union, Junior Rugby Union, & Tertiary Rugby League, as well as lecturing for Sports Medicine Australia. Liza has also worked as a Clinical Supervisor at University of Queensland in the Masters of Sports Physiotherapy programme. Liza works with the Medicals Rugby Union Club. Liza has a specific interest in sports injuries & their prevention. She has always had an interest in postures & movement patterns & is currently combining this interest with her new hobbies of photography & renovation.

Liza has a specific interest in sports injuries & their prevention. Liza is a member of the Australian Physiotherapy Association, Sports Physiotherapy Australia, Physiotherapy Business Australia, Sports Medicine Australia and the Australian College of Physiotherapists.

Liza enjoys the challenge of treating tendon pathology and helping patients avoid if possible or delay, total knee replacements, knee arthroscopes and total hip replacements.

In 2011, Liza  experimented with minimalist running training & completed the Brisbane Half Marathon, the Toowoomba Ridge to Ridge Half Marathon & her first full Marathon in Toowoomba after just 12 weeks training. Liza ran the Twilight Half & Brisbane Running Festival half in 2014 with the added challenge of pushing Xavier in the running pram. August 2014, Liza & Xavier (Pram running) completed the Sunshine Coast Marathon in about four & a quarter hours.

Liza achieved acceptance as a Fellow of the Australian College of Physiotherapists (FACP) in 2009 with the graduation ceremony in October 2011. Liza was appointed by the Australian College of Physiotherapists as a Facilitator to assist candidates through the two year Sports and Exercise Specialisation process, as one of only two inaugural Sports and Exercise Specialisation Facilitators in Australia, for the first training programme. In 2015, Liza was appointed by the Australian College of Physiotherapists as Facilitator for another cohort of candidates undertaking the specialisation process.

Liza is one of only eleven Specialist Sports and Exercise Physiotherapists in Queensland and only about 45 Australia wide.

B.Phty. University of Queensland. 1993.

PGDip Sports Phty. Curtin University. 1996.

Masters Sports Phty. Curtin University. 1998.

APA Titled Sports and Exercise Physiotherapist. 1999.

Specialist Sports and Exercise Physiotherapist – Fellow of the Australian College of Physiotherapists. 2009.

Posted in FAQ, Our Team, Physiotherapists |

179 Given Terrace, Paddington. New Location!

Paddington Physiotherapy & Podiatry was established in June 1999 at 4/219 Given Terrace, Paddington.

After 19 great years it is time we have to say bye to 219 Given Terrace, but we won’t be far! Since Easter, 2018 our clinics new location will be just a block away, where the old video store use to be, 1/179 Given Terrace Paddington.

This time the parking is much better, with spots available on the street and underneath (no tandem parking so don’t stress), drop off options are also available out the front in the late morning and the afternoon. It’s a clearway in the early morning. There’s some Given Terrace 2P spots too.

If you don’t have any appointments booked in, still feel free to come in and say Hi!

We will be at 1/179 Given Terrace,  give us a call on 3511 6352.

Posted in Events & News, FAQ |

Reception – Alissa Wetton

Reception – Alissa Wetton

  After years of being a frequent patient at Paddington Physiotherapy & Podiatry, Alissa has moved on to become part of our reception team. Alissa is a current high school student at Kelvin Grove with a keen interest in mathematics and netball. When she was younger, she enjoyed Gymnastics and going to State competitions with friends. Currently Alissa enjoys keeping fit and healthy through sports.

Alissa hopes that after she graduates, she will be able to travel the world with her friends. In particular she wants to experience Italy as she has developed an interest in their country & culture while studying its language since Prep.

Posted in Our Team, Reception |

179 Given Terrace Paddington – New Location!

Paddington Physiotherapy & Podiatry was established in June 1999 at 4/219 Given Terrace, Paddington.

After 19 great years it is time we have to say bye to 219 Given Terrace, but we won’t be far! After Easter, (starting April 3rd) our clinics new location will be just a block away, where the old video store use to be, 1/179 Given Terrace Paddington.

This time the parking is much better, with spots available on the street and underneath (no tandem parking so don’t stress), drop off options are also available out the front in the late morning and the afternoon. It’s a clearway in the early morning. There’s some Given Terrace 2P spots too

If you don’t have any appointments booked in, still feel free to come in and say Hi! We will be in the new location after Easter (i.e April 3rd onwards).

Any appointments after Easter, will be at 1/179 Given Terrace. But if you are still unsure, give us a call on 3511 6352.

Posted in Events & News, FAQ |

Choose Paddo Physio

Choose Paddo Physio

Why choose physio?

Due to the high clinical expertise of physiotherapists we are first contact practitioners in Australia (since 1977). First contact Practitioners are important primary care providers who are allowed to see private patients without any referral. Although you can still access physiotherapy without a doctor’s referral, Physiotherapists are the most referred to professionals by GPs. Your private health fund can help cover your physiotherapy whether you have received a referral or not.

If you are unsure of whether your condition is suitable for physiotherapy, the best thing to do is call your local practice to find out.

Did you know physiotherapy can help you to improve a wide array of concerns including:

  • Safely returning to exercise after a period of inactivity or post pregnancy
  • Motivation to return to exercise
  • Acute and chronic neck/back conditions
  • Osteoarthritis in hips and knees
  • Many more sporting and musculoskeletal conditions

What makes physio different?

Physiotherapy has evolved from its beginnings in massage therapy in 1906. Initially, practice relied solely on clinical experience and techniques being passed down from old to new practitioners.

While Physiotherapy continues to be a ‘hands-on’ profession with important subtleties in manual techniques, we now also have a depth of scientific research to support the practice. While many techniques have withheld the test of time, others have been taken out of practice and replaced with modern concepts used in our clinic today. Physiotherapy is different to other comparable professions as it continues to improve and refine using the scientific method.

Why Choose Paddo Physio?

At Paddington Physiotherapy we use individualised assessment to maximize the benefit of your consultation. Everybody is unique and there is no single recipe approach to improve back, neck, shoulder or foot pain. In some cases our physiotherapists and podiatrists may work together to provide the best possible management of your condition.

Expertise and Experience

Our Physiotherapists have wide ranging expertise from sports specialists to occupational health experts. Our physiotherapists have experience covering on and off-field management in sports such as:

  • Rugby Union
  • Ultimate Frisbee
  • Rock Climbing
  • Basketball
  • Hockey
  • Marathons
  • Sailing

Check out the profiles of our physios to find out more about the interests of each of our physios.

Clinical Tools

At Paddington Physiotherapy, we use a multitude of tools to help you achieve and maintain your physical best. We use a combination of biomechanical analysis, hands on assessment, strength and flexibility testing to assess the best course of treatment. Treatment are tailored to best suit your needs and may include techniques including hands on manual therapy, massage, dry-needling, strength and flexibility exercises. A recent literature analysis has shown that a combination of exercise and hands on manual therapy is superior to either approach in isolation for neck pain. 

How many physio sessions will I need?

At Paddington Physiotherapy and Podiatry we strive to help you become individual experts of your own conditions and injuries. In addition to resolving your concern it is our goal to help you prevent further injuries and improve to beyond your previous conditioning. The amount and frequency of sessions required will depend on your condition. Your physio will work with you to plan out future sessions to fit with your needs.

Posted in Events & News, FAQ |

Choose Your Physio

Often patients come in after having spent endless amounts of time, effort and money on treatment without seeing any results. By researching and choosing a physiotherapist relevant to their specific injury the client can often achieve better results.

Here are some things to note before choosing a physiotherapist:

Firstly, it’s important that the physiotherapist you choose is fully qualified, registered and a member of the Australian Physiotherapy Association. To check this you can use “Find a Physio” on the Australia Physiotherapy Association Website or check their registration also through the AHPRA (Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency) site. While you’re researching the physiotherapist it’s a good idea to see any reviews for the physio and/or the clinic they practice at. But better still, ask around and see which physio’s people you know have had good experiences with.

Secondly, if there’s a particular problem area you need treated it’s a good idea to find a physio who has a special interest in that area or is a Specialist who is a Fellow of the Australian College of Physiotherapists, as it will mean the physio has further qualifications, experience and expertise in treating your kind of injury.

While many times a client finds it is necessary to pick a clinic based on convenience or price this could end up meaning their physiotherapy isn’t showing the results they wanted because the team they went to didn’t have the skills for their injury. Similarly the price of physiotherapy may vary considerably but it is often relative to the qualifications and experience of the practitioner and the services they’re providing.

Lastly, make sure you discuss your goals, what you expect to get out of treatment and what your desired outcome is with your physiotherapist. This may be to be pain free, to start an exercise program, to return to work or sport, or to improve your sports performance.

So when booking your next physio appointment keep these things in mind and hopefully it’ll help to give you a speedier recovery!

Posted in Client Education, FAQ |

More Podiatry Appointments

 

Gill will have appointments on Tuesday from Early 7am till mid afternoon.

Lachlan will have appointments Saturday mornings from early.

Posted in Events & News, FAQ |

Tubular Bandage for Compression

Tubigrip (also known as tubular compression bandage) is an elastic bandage which provides lasting and effective support to troubled areas with complete freedom of movement. Tubigrip adjusts to the body and provides even pressure among the problem area. The result is comfortable and reusable support that has no requirements for pins and tape.

Physiotherapists frequently provide tubigrip for patients experiencing strains and sprains, soft tissue injuries or ribcage injuries. It can also be used for general oedema.

Tubigrip comes in a variety. Although many places only stock smaller sizes, we make sure all people are considered and have sizes G and F available for people who are requiring larger sizes.

If you have any enquiries give us a call on 3511 6352 and one of our staff will be happy to answer any of your questions.

 

 

Posted in FAQ, Products |

Thoracic Spine Pain – What can I do?

THORACIC SPINE PAIN

What is the thoracic spine?

The thoracic spine is the longest portion of the spinal column & is also know as the mid-back or upper back. It consists of twelve vertebrae & sits directly behind the chest, between the shoulder blades. Each thoracic vertebrae connects to a rib on either side. The ribs then curve around to connect to the sternum at the front, forming the ribcage. Due to these rib attachments, the thoracic spine moves less than the lumbar & cervical spines (low back & neck), making it more stable & less susceptible to injury or wear & tear. When injury does occur however, the thoracic spine can cause significant discomfort & should be treated early to prevent worsening or recurrence.

 How do I injure my thoracic spine?

Usually thoracic spine pain is caused by minor problems in the joints, ligaments or muscles. Disc & nerve injuries can occur in the thoracic spine, but they are not as common as in other areas of the spine.

Whilst pain can be caused by a sudden movement or injury (eg. a sudden awkward twist or a fall), often the pain starts gradually or for no obvious reason at all. It may be caused by sleeping badly the night before, spending too much time on the computer, or being on a long plane flight/car trip.

What are the symptoms?

The symptoms will depend on which structure is injured. But generally, the thoracic spine can give you pain under or between your shoulder blades, into your shoulder or arm and even into your chest or abdomen. It can be a deep ache, a sharp, localised pain, or a sharp pain down the arm with pins & needles/numbness associated. As a result of the rib attachments to the thoracic spine, it is not unusual to experience pain with a deep breath in.

 

What can I do to prevent thoracic spine pain?

There are a number of things you can to do help maintain a happy thoracic spine. First & foremost is making sure you sit & stand with good posture. In sitting try to maintain the curve in your low back (you can do this with a lumbar roll or a rolled up towel placed in the small of your back), draw your shoulders down & in gently, & tuck your chin in. It is also important to use a good quality mattress & pillow to sleep on, & to avoid sleeping, standing & moving in awkward ways.

If you suspect that your thoracic spine is giving you pain, make sure you have it assessed & treated quickly. Often this area of the spine responds well to physiotherapy treatment, & your physio can also help determine what factors may have contributed to the problem to prevent it happening again.

Posted in Backs Necks & Headaches, Client Education |